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Last time we looked at how  new technology is allowing multiple sclerosis researchers to see misalignments in the upper neck that are leading to increased intracranial pressure, cerebral spinal fluid leaks and eventually the process of multiple sclerosis. The most exciting aspect of these findings is that unlike nerve tissue, the myelin sheaths that are damaged  in multiple sclerosis  can regenerate – once the cause of their destruction is eliminated. The paper suggests that once the intervention is applied the obstruction of the flow of CSF in the cervical spine could relieve the increased CSF pressure within the ventricles and eliminate the resultant leakage of fluid into the surrounding brain tissue and the inflammation of the myelin sheaths that it generates. Once the leakage has been stopped, the myelin sheaths could be repaired by the body with the prospect of a return to normal nerve function for these nerves. So how do you stop the leakage? It all starts in the neck.     All the participants in the study and all subsequent research using this type of technology has  shown a history of head and neck trauma that precipitates the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.   After head & neck trauma the upper neck area is generally the area that is most affected and causes the most problems for the brain and the body. During the initial study, the Fonar technology was able  to clearly identify  the malalignment of C-1  in the upright position.   This malalignment was successfully treated using an upper cervical specific correction. The patient’s MS symptoms, severe vertigo accompanied by vomiting when  lying down  and stumbling from unequal leg length, ceased upon treatment. Not only did the patient symptoms go away after correcting  the alignment of the upper cervical spine but the CSF flow measurements obtained immediately following  the treatment exhibited a 28.6% reduction in pressure and the CSF flow was now normal.   Leading researchers to conclude that with proper alignment and continued improvement in CSF flow the patient’s nervous system will heal. The patient’s alignment is currently being maintained and she is still free of her MS symptoms (vertigo and vomiting on recumbency). In conclusion, the researchers said: “the results of our investigation suggest that Multiple Sclerosis may be biomechanical in origin wherein traumatic injuries to the cervical spine result in cervical pathologies that impede the normal circulation of CSF to and from the brain. The resulting obstruction of CSF outflow from the brain impairs the outflow of CSF from the lateral ventricles of the brain where 500 cc of cerebrospinal fluid is generated daily by the choroid plexuses (20). The obstruction to CSF outflow would result...

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Headaches  BBC is reportingthat up to a million people in the UK have “completely preventable” severe headaches caused by taking too many painkillers, doctors have said. They said some were trapped in a “vicious cycle” of taking pain relief, which then caused even more headaches. The warning came as part of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence’s (NICE) first guidelines for treating headaches “Medication overuse headaches” feel the same as other common headaches or migraines. There is no definitive UK data on the incidence of the condition, but studies in other countries suggest 1-2% of people are affected, while the World Health Organization says figures closer to 5% have been reported. While painkillers would be many people’s instant response, they could be making sufferers feel even worse. Prof Martin Underwood, from Warwick Medical School, who led the NICE panel, said: “This can end up getting into a vicious cycle where your headache gets worse, so you take more painkillers, so your headache gets worse and this just becomes worse and worse and worse. “It is such an easy thing to prevent.” Exactly how painkillers have this effect on the brain is unknown. Most of the people affected are thought to have started with either everyday, tension-type headaches or migraines. The headaches then became worse as they treated themselves at home. Main types of headache Tension – the common “everyday” headache most people will experience at some point in their lives. In some cases people have tension headaches on most days of the month. Migraine – severe headache that can last for several days. It gets worse with activity and often comes with nausea as well as sensitivity to light and sound. Cluster – extremely severe pain around the eye and side of the face, also includes swelling and a red watery eye. Some people report eight attacks a day, which can last up to three hours. Medication overuse – feels like a tension headache or a migraine, but is due to taking too many painkillers. However, there are more than 200 types of headache. Manjit Matharu, a consultant neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, said there was a tipping point at 10 to 15 days of using pain relief each month when the drugs became the issue.He said, “This is a huge problem in the population. The figures in terms of the number of people who have medication overuse headache are one in 50, so that is approximately a million people who have headaches on a daily or near daily basis because they’re using painkillers.” The new guidelines for doctors in England and Wales...

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For decades multiple sclerosis researchers have discussed the correlation between trauma and the onset of MS. But until recently, researchers were unable to directly see the CSF leaks and CSF flow obstructions that have now been made visible by new technology called phase coded MR imaging. A paper, titled “The Possible Role of Cranio-Cervical Trauma and Abnormal CSF Hydrodynamics in the Genesis of Multiple Sclerosis,” was recently published and appears in the journal Physiological Chemistry and Physics and Medical NMR (Sept. 20, 2011, 41: 1-17). Commenting on the study, the lead researcher, Raymond V. Damadian stated, “These new observations have uncovered biomechanical barriers that appear to give rise to multiple sclerosis, and, even more excitingly, these barriers may be therapeutically addressable.” Translation: problems in the neck effect the flow of fluid to and from the brain and this change in fluid is likely leading to multiple sclerosis.  The findings are based on viewing the real-time flow of cerebrospinal fluid in a series of randomly chosen patients with multiple sclerosis.  The cerebrospinal fluid, known as CSF, lubricates the brain and spinal cord. Damadian and co-researcher, Chu, discovered obstructions of the CSF flow in all eight patients in the study and, in seven out of eight patients, the obstruction was more pronounced when the patient was in the upright position. The obstruction comes as the first few bones in your neck becomes misaligned and causes a backup of CSF.  This obstruction is most likely more pronounced in an upright posture.  When this misalignment was corrected, the study shows pressure decreases by 28.6%! The flow also becomes uniform again once treatment is given. The idea of the fluid (CSF and blood) collecting in the brain due to the poor draining and improper position of these vertebrae is under review for a cause of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease as well. When viewing MRI scans of the first patient, Damadian hypothesized that any obstructions of the continuous circulation of the daily volume of CSF out of the brain to the spinal cord and back could cause increased pressure within the ventricles, which could result in leakage of the fluid into the brain tissue surrounding the ventricles.  These leaks within the brain are believed to start the process of multiple sclerosis. References: Physiol. Chem. Phys. & Med. NMR (20 September 2011) 41: 1–17 What to Do Next To find a Doctor in your area go to www.upCspine.com or if you are in the Boise Idaho area to schedule a consultation to discuss your health concerns click the button below: Schedule an Appointment Dr. Alan Fox of Advanced Upper Cervical Chiropractic Wellness in Boise, Idaho has been helping people with a...

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Whiplash Symptoms May Be Slight at First  An injury to the neck caused by a sudden movement of the head, backward, forward, or sideways, is commonly referred to as “whiplash.” While the term “whiplash” is most frequently used to describe auto accident injuries (in which a person is rear-ended, hit head-on, or hit from the side), whiplash can also frequently occur during ski accidents, bike accidents, falls, blows to the head, and other head/neck traumas. THE MYTH: “If I don’t have any symptoms right away, I’m O.K.”. THE TRUTH… After many auto and sport-related traumas, symptoms can be so slight at first, an individual may not realize he/she has been injured. Even if a person feels relatively normal after an accident, he/she should be thoroughly examined. Symptoms can be delayed for days, months, or even years. COMMON SYMPTOMS: The following are symptoms that can occur following a head/neck injury (days to years later): Neck pain and/or stiffness Blurred or double vision Irritability Depression Fatigue Insomnia Dizziness / Vertigo Pain between the shoulder blades Pain in the arms, legs, feet, hands Headaches, Migraines Low back pain and/or stiffness Shoulder pain Nausea Ringing in the ears (tinnitus), Hearing loss Numbness and tingling Jaw and/or face pain Post-concussion syndrome and many more! In many cases, more severe immune-related, neurological, pain, and disease conditions (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Susceptibility to Infection, ADHD, Seizures, Multiple Sclerosis) can result from head/neck injuries, sometimes occurring many years after the accident. WHIPLASH FACTS Two million people are exposed to whiplash injury (related to an auto accident) in the U.S. every year. When the head is suddenly jerked back and forth or side-to-side beyond its normal limits, ligaments supporting the neck vertebrae can be sprained (over-stretched) or torn, forcing vertebrae out of their normal position. In tests of low speed rear impact collisions, it was reported that the neck can be injured even in slow speeds accidents as low as 5 mph. Most rear impact accidents occur at crash speeds of 6 to 12 mph – speeds below the threshold for property damage to the vehicle – but sufficient to cause neck injury. Whiplash injuries to the cervical spine can occur in sports (skiing, hockey, football, cycling, ice skating, gymnastics, boxing), during falls (down a flight of stairs, on an icy sidewalk), and many more! HOW CAN NUCCA HELP AN ACCIDENT SUFFERER? If a person (infant, child, or adult) experiences an accident, a proper spinal exam is necessary to assess whether a neck injury occurred. An NUCCA upper cervical chiropractic specialist uses specialized testing and specific x-rays of the upper neck to accurately assess a neck injury. If a...

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Retinal Migraine  Have you been experiencing strange symptoms in one of your eyes? Seen flashing lights, suffered temporary blindness or seen patterns in your visual field? Have you been to your medical doctor and received a diagnosis of retinal migraine? Have you been told that medications are the only answer for your headaches? The problem may actually be one of blood flow, and the solution may be traced to an accident or injury in your past.  But what exactly is a retinal migraine? Here are five signs that you can use to tell if you have retinal migraine… One eye: First, the eye symptoms tend to affect only one eye. Visual disturbances: So what’s going on in this one eye? There are a variety of disturbances which other migraine sufferers may be familiar with. This might include flashing lights, or patterns in your visual field. There may be an area where your vision is impaired (ie dark spots), or even loss. Even temporary blindness in one eye is possible with retinal migraine. Temporary: Permanent vision loss is another matter. With retinal migraine the symptoms are reversible. Headache: A headache typically starts during the visual disturbances, or within an hour after they stop. The headache typically lasts between 4 hours to as long as 3 days, is often one-sided and pulsating, and usually either includes sensitivity to light and/or sound, nausea, or both. Repeated: In order to actually be diagnosed with retinal migraine, you need to have had at least 2 attacks. Researchers suspect decreased blood flow to the eye or optic nerve may be to blame for the unique symptoms of retinal migraine. This decreased blood flow can be a result of trauma to the upper neck. Accidents and injuries affecting the head and neck can lead to misalignments which can change blood flow from the brain to the body. An Upper Cervical specialist is able to closely examine the anatomy of the upper neck with both physical examination procedures and specific x-ray protocols. By identifying these specific misalignments the Upper Cervical trained doctor may be able to find the missing link and underlying cause of the retinal migraine. What to Do Next To find a Doctor in your area go to www.upCspine.com or if you are in the Boise Idaho area to schedule a consultation to discuss your health concerns click the button below: Schedule an Appointment Dr. Alan Fox of Advanced Upper Cervical Chiropractic Wellness in Boise, Idaho has been helping people with a variety of different problems for over 30 years. He is one of only a few doctors in the entire state of Idaho who are...

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Viewing Multiple Sclerosis in a New Way New technology is allowing multiple sclerosis researchers to see misalignments in the upper neck that are leading to increased intracranial pressure, cerebral spinal fluid leaks and eventually the process of multiple sclerosis. The most exciting aspect of these findings is that unlike nerve tissue, the myelin sheaths that are damaged in multiple sclerosis can regenerate – once the cause of their destruction is eliminated. The paper suggests that once the intervention is applied the obstruction of the flow of CSF in the cervical spine could relieve the increased CSF pressure within the ventricles and eliminate the resultant leakage of fluid into the surrounding brain tissue and the inflammation of the myelin sheaths that it generates. Once the leakage has been stopped, the myelin sheaths could be repaired by the body with the prospect of a return to normal nerve function for these nerves. So how do you stop the leakage? It all starts in the neck.   All the participants in the study and all subsequent research using this type of technology has shown a history of head and neck trauma that precipitates the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.  After head & neck trauma the upper neck area is generally the area that is most affected and causes the most problems for the brain and the body. During the initial study, the Fonar technology was able to clearly identify the malalignment of C-1 in the upright position.  This malalignment was successfully treated using an upper cervical specific correction. The patient’s MS symptoms, severe vertigo accompanied by vomiting when lying down and stumbling from unequal leg length, ceased upon treatment. Not only did the patient symptoms go away after correcting the alignment of the upper cervical spine but the CSF flow measurements obtained immediately following the treatment exhibited a 28.6% reduction in pressure and the CSF flow was now normal.  Leading researchers to conclude that with proper alignment and continued improvement in CSF flow the patient’s nervous system will heal. The patient’s alignment is currently being maintained and she is still free of her MS symptoms (vertigo and vomiting on recumbency). In conclusion, the researchers said: “the results of our investigation suggest that Multiple Sclerosis may be biomechanical in origin wherein traumatic injuries to the cervical spine result in cervical pathologies that impede the normal circulation of CSF to and from the brain. The resulting obstruction of CSF outflow from the brain impairs the outflow of CSF from the lateral ventricles of the brain where 500 cc of cerebrospinal fluid is generated daily by the choroid plexuses (20). The obstruction to CSF outflow would result in an increase in ventricular CSF pressure (ICP) which in...

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